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With chicks arrival, new spring routines begin

We are settling into a new routine here on the farm. One that is full of work. While the weather may have decided to shift back to winter, the preparations for spring are beginning. Winter rest is over.

It’s the morning after our first night with the latest crops of chicks. All 58 pullets and two turkey poults seem happy and healthy waking up to their third day of life. We lost one of the chicks almost immediately, but she didn’t look right from the git-go. We are starting our pullets early this year in hopes that they will be laying in August or September, well before the days start shortening.

A flock of red sex link pullets.

A flock of red sex link pullets.

A mix of barred rock and black sex link pullets and two turkey poults.

A mix of barred rock and black sex link pullets and two turkey poults.

One of the two turkey poults.

One of the two turkey poults. The kids have named them a few times. Initially, Kadence thought they should be called Thanksgiving and Christmas (HA!). Last night, they were renamed as Perry and Jackie.

Barred rock pullet looks like a little penguin!

Barred rock pullet looks like a little penguin!

Patrick Star keeping an eye on our new roomies.

Patrick Star keeping an eye on our new roomies.

When this next round of weather passes our plan is to lock off the current laying flock from their yard (they graze the farm grounds during non-gardening daylight hours any way) and plant some rye grass. Hopefully, the grass will be tall enough by the time my garden is in full swing. The goal is that the rye grass will keep the birds busy during those long months I leave them cooped up to protect my garden produce. Don’t even get me started on last year’s broccoli crop that they COMPLETELY devoured. I guess I’m still a little bitter.

I’ve got our cabbage and cauliflower seeds sprouting in the dining room window seat, with plans to start broccoli seeds inside on Saturday. So far the set up is working well. There’s lots of sun from the three windows and it’s conveniently near a heating vent which gives them a little extra warmth. The seeds took a little over a week to sprout. It’s so exciting to watch the green stems shoot from the soil. Tiny little miracles!

Little cabbage sprout.

Little cabbage sprout.

Little cauliflower sprout

Little cauliflower sprout

I’ll keep you posted on the progress of our spring projects!

Homestead-Barn-Hop-NEW

Categories: Animals on the farm

Tagged as:

Ginia

My name is Ginia Oehlschlager and I'm a small-town gal from Missouri. Join me as I document my crazy life on the farm with my husband and four kids. I'm always looking for frugal, simple ways to live the life God set before me. Where faith, family and fun come together on the farm.

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